about trafficking

Trafficking is a industry where the victims are kept slaves for the sole purpose of financial gain for the criminals behind.

 

The women forced to work in the sex industry are exposed to assault, threats, abuse, and humiliation which can have major physical and psychological consequences for them.

The EU Directive 2011/36/EU provides the following definition of human trafficking:

 

"The recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of persons, including exchange or transfer of control over that person, by means of the threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, of abduction, of fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability or of the giving or receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation."

 

"A position of vulnerability occurs when the person has no real or acceptable alternative but to submit to the abuse involved."

 

"Exploitation shall include, as a minimum, the exploitation of the prostitution of others or other forms of sexual exploitation, forced labour or services, including begging, slavery or practices similar to slavery, servitude, or the exploitation of criminal activities or the removal of organs."

EU definition 

(a) “Trafficking in persons” shall mean the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of persons, by means of the threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, of abduction, of fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability or of the giving or receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation. Exploitation shall include, at a minimum, the exploitation of the prostitution of others or other forms of sexual exploitation, forced labour or 

services, slavery or practices similar to slavery, servitude or the removal of organs; 

 

  (b) The consent of a victim of trafficking in persons to the intended exploitation set forth in subparagraph (a) of this article shall be irrelevant where any of the means set forth in subparagraph (a) have been used; 

  (c) The recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of a child for the purpose of exploitation shall be considered “trafficking in persons” even if this does not involve any of the means set forth in subparagraph (a) of this article;  

 

 (d) “Child” shall mean any person under eighteen years of age.

The numbers

 

UNODC, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime report here.

2016 report on trafficking in Europe by EUROPOL here.

More detailed statistics on trafficking in the EU can be found in the Eurostat report from 2015 here.

 

10 to 30 customers a day

What happens to a girl working during a day as a prostitute (trafficked or not) is indeed very difficult to describe - especially if the girl is trafficked and being an actual sex slave. But some studies on the subject may support you with a solid picture of the subject.

Many studies have been carried out in different countries. The picture is more or less the same all over the world.

 

Seen in the tables are parts of a major analysis done in the USA regarding street prostitution and call girls. Unlike other studies of female prostitute populations that are based on convenience samples, the study named "RAND" utilized an "area/day/shift" design to draw a probability sample of 998 street prostitutes.eption and unilateral report. 

Two populations of female prostitutes interested the researchers. First and foremost, they targeted the numerous and visible prostitutes on the streets. Second, they targeted the various groups that make up the less accessible subpopulation of off-street prostitutes - the call girls.

 

The reader should keep in mind that characteristics of the details of the transaction with the prostitute are based on her perception and unilateral report.